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Big Rambler, large covered porch and why wouldn’t you add the covered porch?

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I often wonder why folks don’t upgrade to a large covered porch when ordering a home. Having the space on the lot makes it easy. Adding the covered area in essence increases your living space. Add a fan, TV jack, lights, and you’ll enjoy the space often year round. Here is a house we finished in the Spokane area some time back and a few other covered porch ideas.

 

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Terry S Pemberton-Expert Construction Loan Officer

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True Built Home’s brief interview with one of the Pacific Northwest lending construction loan officer, Terry S. Pemberton of Umpqua Bank

 

Terry first of all, how long have you been in the lender business, and how many years total in the construction lending side of things?

Well Lewis, I’ve been in the mortgage banking industry since 1989 and I have specialized in construction lending for 20 years.

Terry, it’s good to hear that you moved from one nationally recognized bank to a more regional lender with Umpqua Bank. Why the move?

After a lot of analysis, I determined that Umpqua Bank’s construction loan products offered a better overall structure which is more beneficial to the needs of the local borrowers and builders in our area.

If a client were to ask, “which lender does TBH recommend for their construction loan?” why might we tell clients to use you?

Lewis, our construction loan products have low fees and great rates as compared to some of the other products on the market.  But even more important to some borrowers, is the low down payment feature if the borrower does not already own the land. If a borrower is in title on the land at the time of application, they can utilize the equity from the future finished value of the new home and land together, as if the home is already built on their lot. The benefit to the borrower is that the equity can be applied to the down payment. These unique features can be a huge help to some borrowers.

How many construction loans have you done over the course of your professional career and how does this experience help the customer?

I’ve probably closed over 1000 construction loans in the last 20 years. My experience in construction lending helps me guide the borrower through a complex loan with ease because I’ve had the opportunity of working with borrowers through so many different scenarios over the years.

What has been the average loan amount?

My construction loans have ranged from $50,000 to $2,000,000, but, on average they are typically in the $200,000 to $400,000 range.

Are construction loans more expensive than say a refi or purchase?

Yes, construction loans in general are more expensive than most other types of residential mortgages, mainly because the loan needs to include fees for the monthly inspections and drawsOne advantage at Umpqua Bank is that we process and fund all draws internally through our own Custom Construction Draw Department. This means that builders will always work with an Umpqua Associate and never a 3rd party.

What documents are normally needed from the client to close on a construction loan?

Each borrower’s personal financial situation is different, but generally, financial items needed are the same as any other mortgage. As for the construction portion of the loan, I will need to document the project with a contract from the general contractor, plot plan, description of the materials, and a line item budget of all the costs.  The borrower may have portions of the project that will be completed by someone other than their general contractor.  This could be for things like the septic system, a new well or landscaping.  If that’s the case, we’ll need documentation for those items as well.  I will give the customer and the builder a complete list of the items we require early on in the process so that everyone knows what all will be needed.

How long will a construction loan take to close?

The time to complete a construction loan can vary quite a bit depending on each scenario.  From the time I receive a complete credit package and a complete builder and project package we can usually close the loan within 60 days.  Things that can extend that time frame are finding land on which to build, getting septic approval, getting bids for items that won’t be completed by the general contractor or changes to the project after the appraisal has been completed.  When I meet with a customer I explain the details and set expectations based on their situation.

What are some typical “hiccups” to construction loans?

Obtaining the various permits required in association with the building project can create delays. Also, unexpected cost overruns can occur during construction.  If a borrower started with temporary construction financing instead of a one-time close loan, they may have trouble getting approved for their permanent financing if they have had changes to their financial condition during the course of construction. Certainly other “hiccups” can occur also.

What do you think stresses out most clients during the process?

I advise all of my borrowers to try and have patience throughout the process. Many things can stress out the borrower since this may be the first time they have built a home and the long list of decisions they need to make in a short period of time will tend to add to their normal stress load. The main idea to keep in mind is the finished product will be something they can enjoy for many years to come.  They need to talk about setting proper expectations up front, having solid plans and specs, keeping changes to a minimum and keeping in mind that they may run into unanticipated snags.

We know you do business with TBH competitors, but if you were to offer a compliment about True Built Home to our prospective clients, what might that be?

The fact that TBH survived and grew out of the 2008 real estate market is impressive by itself. In addition, I think TBH can include itself in a general group of on-your-lot builders who recognize the need of a middle market, custom home product, and understand how to display and deliver the concept to the marketplace.

Thank you, Terry for your time.

 

Loans subject to credit approval.

Terry S. Pemberton

Home Lending Officer NMLS ID 185396
Direct: 360-280-4208
Fax: 888-977-9408
Email: terrypemberton@umpquabank.com
Web: www.umpquabank.com/tpemberton

Terry can serve all of True Built Home’s locations and branches.

The Beauty and the Beast of hot water tanks

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There is an ever growing trend that appears to be gaining each and every month which is the press towards more energy-efficient items in one’s home. I think every paying customer out there who gets their utility bill, every month or two for some, is ‘WOW… is there anything I can do to minimize the “bite” the government (PUD) takes from your wallet?’ There may be very little to do for folks who elect to live within a city’s limits because the city often charges a fee for trash, storm drainage, sewer, water. However, when it comes to electricity, yeah, there are things that you can do to minimize the “bite”.

With this article, you’ll be getting into some pretty hot water with us. Hot water tanks, and equally the manufactures of them, are getting to where the cost to heat cold to hot is getting more and more palatable. I lived in a South American county for three years, and basically we used what was called a Lucha. (See photo below).

shower-head-latin-america-225x300

Now, if you think we were a little frightened to step into a shower, stand in water with a device likely not connected to a GFI, turn the water on and get hot water out, (think of a toaster as the way it works) and enjoy the experience, then think again. These are probably the most efficient means to heat cold to hot, but if we think most North Americans will adopt this means, well, I think that would take a real effort. Instead, manufactures of hot water tanks, and or devices to accomplish the same thing, have made strides in recent years.

The newer wave tanks are called “on-demand” or instantaneous tanks, and we also have Hybrid which work like heat pumps. All promise to save on your monthly bill, but the question is: what’s the difference you pay and how long will it take to recoup the additional cost of the new generation tank. Another thing to give consideration is the ability to get parts, qualified technicians and the cost of maintenance.

Cost: The obvious theory is, you heat the water when you need it (heat pump hybrids are different in their means to save money) thus saving most families about 30% annually, or on average about $300-360 yearly. Old water tanks cost significantly less from the start; a 50 gallon can cost around $350-500, where your on-demand costs vary as to your needs.  A family of say two could use a smaller on-demand and pay around $300 for a unit where a family of 4 would obviously need more water per minute, so you’d likely have to pay around $1200-1400 for the unit.  The thing to keep in mind is capacity per minute, like the Rinnai RU98EP LPG Tankless Water Heater. True Built Home does not endorse or recommend one or another when it comes to manufactures. Each person should do their own due diligence and make a sound choice based upon you and your family’s needs. With our math in place, it would stand to reason that after say the third year of living with the new water heater, it will have paid for itself. If the unit lasts longer, which is another positive reason to choose to install them, you should start to enjoy some savings every month. You might feel good too because after all, you are not wasting either your money or resources.

Water flow: as we mentioned above, your needs as a family or individual will affect which on-demand tankless hot water unit you install.  The really terrific thing is these units will spit out hot water until the cows come home because they never run out of hot water. Whereas the older technology is, it holds 50 gallons and when it’s gone, it takes another 20-30 minutes to heat up the new water. Probably the big knock against the newer units is the water temperature tends to fluctuate between a little cold to a little hotter. However each year the manufactures are getting closer to perfecting the results, and should not in itself prevent you from considering this option as to the means to heat water for your family.

Size: The old style tanks take up way more room than the on-demand units; another plus for those who have a tight space or just want to free up more room for other things.

Last note: If you are considering an on-demand water heater, good for you, but keep a few things in mind: Think about the size you need. This is the most important thing, in my opinion, when it comes to choosing a unit. Next is to read a good amount of reviews; do your homework. Lastly, and I am only telling you what others in the industry have told me, stay away from electric on-demand units and if at all possible stay with either natural or propane units. I am told by several plumbers (in fact, they won’t install them) is that the electrical units are more temperamental, break down more frequently, and do not provide the consistency of a gas unit. Happy buying.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Show me the equity!

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In reading this article I found in it some sobering facts, especially the one about homes that are in the $200k range. If having equity in your home is important you’ll enjoy this piece. If you would like to read the article from the original site, here is the link.

Staff TBH

 

WASHINGTON — If you’re like most homeowners, it’s your biggest asset. You can’t track it online or check monthly statements sent to you by a bank, but it’s crucially important for your personal financial well-being and your retirement planning.

It’s your home equity — the difference between the market value of your house and whatever debt you’ve got on it. Equity for most of us is a big deal, and based on data released recently by the Federal Reserve, Americans’ home-equity holdings are booming.

Related story: New online calculator makes fees in mortgage offers transparent

That’s great news for most owners — though not all — and for the economy as a whole. The more equity we have, the more likely we are to spend money on goods and services that create more jobs — the so-called wealth effect.

Now consider these brain-bending big numbers: Thanks to rising prices and substantial continuing pay-downs of mortgage debt, owners’ combined equity holdings increased by $795 billion during the three months ended March 31. Homeowners’ equity holdings at the end of the first quarter totaled $10.8 trillion, the highest amount since late 2007 — but still well below the bubble-era record of $13.4 trillion reached in early 2006.

 

REAL ESTATE

Condos are becoming FHA no-lending zones

SEE ALL RELATED

 

The ongoing boom is also pulling thousands of owners across the country out of real estate purgatory — they’ve been stuck in negative equity positions but are now transitioning to positive. According to new estimates from mortgage and housing analytics firm CoreLogic, the owners of 312,000 houses moved out of negative territory during the first three months of 2014. If prices rise just 5% in the year ahead, say researchers, an additional 1.2 million owners could do the sale.

Now for the sobering side of the home-equity story: Despite the boom in housing wealth underway, many owners are still unable to join the party. About 6.3 million of them remain underwater on their loans. The average amount of negative equity they’re carrying is often significant — they owe an average 33% more than their house could command in a sale today. That gives you an idea of the widespread pain still being felt in the wake of the bust and recession.

The impact is especially severe for owners who bought with little or nothing down and then loaded on additional debt with second mortgages. The average negative equity balance for owners with two mortgages is about $75,000, according to CoreLogic. For households with one mortgage, the average negative equity is around $52,000.

Also on the sobering side, millions of owners continue to have less equity than they’ll need if they want to sell or even refinance. At the end of March, 10 million owners had less than 20% equity in their properties, and 1.6 million of them had less than 5%. Given real estate transaction costs, most people with less than 5% equity would have to bring money to the table to pay off the debt on their house when they sell.

Equity holdings are closely linked to market segments — higher-cost houses are less likely to be in negative equity positions than lower-cost homes — and geography. According to CoreLogic, only about 3% of homes costing more than $500,000 have negative equity. By contrast, 17% of homes costing less than $200,000 are in negative positions.

Not surprisingly, areas of the country that performed worst during the bust — where easy-money financing was most common during the boom — continue to have high rates of negative equity, even well into the housing rebound. But there’s one dazzling exception: California. In some inland counties during the recession, toxic financing contributed to home value losses of 50% and higher. Yet today, thanks to the most vigorous marketplace rebound of any state, just above 11% of California homes are in negative equity. Compare that with 29% in Nevada, 27% in Florida, 20% in Arizona.

Where are average equity levels highest? Texas, where home prices remained modest and affordable during the boom, is at the top. Just 3.3% of Texas homes have debt exceeding their resale values. Rounding out the top five, Montana, Alaska, North Dakota and Hawaii all have less than 5% negative equity on average. The District of Columbia, a high-cost market that has seen significant home-price appreciation in the last several years, ranks sixth best in the country with a 5.1% negative equity rate.

 

Equity in your home, or the lack there of

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I read this article; although a few months old, I found in it some sobering facts, especially the one about homes that are in the $200k range and the owners equity, or lack there of, position. I have highlighted it below.

Staff TBH

—-

WASHINGTON — If you’re like most homeowners, it’s your biggest asset. You can’t track it online or check monthly statements sent to you by a bank, but it’s crucially important for your personal financial well-being and your retirement planning.

It’s your home equity — the difference between the market value of your house and whatever debt you’ve got on it. Equity for most of us is a big deal, and based on data released recently by the Federal Reserve, Americans’ home-equity holdings are booming.

That’s great news for most owners — though not all — and for the economy as a whole. The more equity we have, the more likely we are to spend money on goods and services that create more jobs — the so-called wealth effect.

Now consider these brain-bending big numbers: Thanks to rising prices and substantial continuing pay-downs of mortgage debt, owners’ combined equity holdings increased by $795 billion during the three months ended March 31. Homeowners’ equity holdings at the end of the first quarter totaled $10.8 trillion, the highest amount since late 2007 — but still well below the bubble-era record of $13.4 trillion reached in early 2006.

The ongoing boom is also pulling thousands of owners across the country out of real estate purgatory — they’ve been stuck in negative equity positions but are now transitioning to positive. According to new estimates from mortgage and housing analytics firm CoreLogic, the owners of 312,000 houses moved out of negative territory during the first three months of 2014. If prices rise just 5% in the year ahead, say researchers, an additional 1.2 million owners could do the same.

Now for the sobering side of the home-equity story: Despite the boom in housing wealth underway, many owners are still unable to join the party. About 6.3 million of them remain underwater on their loans. The average amount of negative equity they’re carrying is often significant — they owe an average 33% more than their house could command in a sale today. That gives you an idea of the widespread pain still being felt in the wake of the bust and recession.

The impact is especially severe for owners who bought with little or nothing down and then loaded on additional debt with second mortgages. The average negative equity balance for owners with two mortgages is about $75,000, according to CoreLogic. For households with one mortgage, the average negative equity is around $52,000.

Also on the sobering side, millions of owners continue to have less equity than they’ll need if they want to sell or even refinance. At the end of March, 10 million owners had less than 20% equity in their properties, and 1.6 million of them had less than 5%. Given real estate transaction costs, most people with less than 5% equity would have to bring money to the table to pay off the debt on their house when they sell.

Equity holdings are closely linked to market segments — higher-cost houses are less likely to be in negative equity positions than lower-cost homes — and geography. According to CoreLogic, only about 3% of homes costing more than $500,000 have negative equity. By contrast, 17% of homes costing less than $200,000 are in negative positions.

Not surprisingly, areas of the country that performed worst during the bust — where easy-money financing was most common during the boom — continue to have high rates of negative equity, even well into the housing rebound. But there’s one dazzling exception: California. In some inland counties during the recession, toxic financing contributed to home value losses of 50% and higher. Yet today, thanks to the most vigorous marketplace rebound of any state, just above 11% of California homes are in negative equity. Compare that with 29% in Nevada, 27% in Florida, 20% in Arizona.

Where are average equity levels highest? Texas, where home prices remained modest and affordable during the boom, is at the top. Just 3.3% of Texas homes have debt exceeding their resale values. Rounding out the top five, Montana, Alaska, North Dakota and Hawaii all have less than 5% negative equity on average. The District of Columbia, a high-cost market that has seen significant home-price appreciation in the last several years, ranks sixth best in the country with a 5.1% negative equity rate.

Raised Heel Truss

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In one of the more common areas to save on your heating cost, the raised heel truss with additional insulation is one that is in reach for most of our clients. Essentially, at the ends of the hip part of the roof, the angle of roof to exterior wall becomes very small. As a result, almost the entire perimeter of the home, where your roof hips, you are loosing heat or better know as money. In the picture below, you will see what a standard home comes like, and what a “raised heel truss” looks like;

Raised-Heel-truss

 

By raising the truss up off the top plate and increasing the area between truss and sheet rock to roof under sheathing, you effectively gain enough area to provide a higher insulation value for those areas. If say we were building both types of homes and they are each roughly 1000 sq-ft homes, the house on the left, or a standard truss package, would get only 900 sq-ft of R49 whereas the rest of the areas would be roughly R20. That is a significant amount of insulation loss. When raising the heel, effectively you have increased all the areas to get the maximum amount of insulation as possible. Add R60 in the roof and you really have a home that will save you money.

 

Why not ask one of our helpful home consultants how much these upgrade cost. Contact True Built Home now!

 

True Built Home-we are adding a few new plans

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We have been busy and are inviting you to take a look at three new plans.
The Jasmine-big, open rambler sure to delight those needing floor space.
on your lot, custom home, custom home builder

The Jasmine

The North Wood-Perfect 2 story ready to fit on smaller city lots.
1917-North-wood--720x480
The Chadwick-the one we are really excited about!
Chadwick_2044_1920x1080
The Ripple Cove-we have re-designed the floor plan with easier access to the kitchen
ripple-cove-rambler-home-plan
The Chadwick and the Jasmine come standard with the hip style roof.
Our standards are other companies upgrades. If you are going to get a long term loan, you should at least get a long term home. With True Built Home, why not settle for more!

Drywall Level Finish

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Every once in a while we run into a difference of opinion with a client over the finish standard of our garages when they want to have the garage fully sheet-rocked. Some have come under the impression that the finish should be the same as the house, which can be done, but is rarely done if ever. After all, it’s a garage. So to help folks out, we put together some photos and descriptions for you to let you know what we offer for the upgrade to have your garage fully sheet-rocked. If you desire a higher finish, let us know and we can do it for a moderate upgrade cost.
Level 0 is used in temporary construction or if final decoration is undetermined. No taping or finishing is required.

 

A Level 1 finish is recommended in areas that would generally be concealed from view or in areas that are not open to public traffic. Joint tape need not be covered with joint compound to fulfill the requirements of Level 1. In Level 1, the surface is left free of excess joint compound. Ridges and tool marks are acceptable for a Level 1 finish. This level is often specified in the plenum area above ceilings, in attics, or in service corridors. In some geographic areas this level is referred to as “fire-taping”.

Level0

 

Level 2-this is the finish that True Built Home offers and what is completed at the upgrade price.

In garages, warehouse storage areas and other similar areas where the final surface appearance is not of concern, a Level 2 finish is the recommendation. Level 2 may be specified where moisture resistant gypsum board is used as a tile substrate. Level 2 reads, “All joints and interior angles shall have tape embedded in joint compound and wiped with a joint knife leaving a thin coating of joint compound over all joints and interior angles”. This differentiates Level 2 from Level 1. Joint compound is applied over all fastener heads and beads. The surface is left free of excess joint compound. Ridges and tool marks are acceptable for a Level 2 finish.

Additionally, Level 2 includes the following sentence: “Joint compound applied over the body of the tape at the time of tape embedment shall be considered a separate coat of joint compound and shall satisfy the conditions of this level.” In the past there has been some confusion as to whether tape pressed into joint compound and covered with joint compound in a single operation fulfilled the requirements of Level 1 or Level 2

Level1

 

Level 3
In areas to be decorated with a medium or heavy hand and spray applied textures or where heavy-grade wall coverings will become the final decoration, a Level 3 finish is recommended. Level 3 states, “All joints and interior angles shall have tape embedded in joint compound and shall be immediately wiped with a joint knife leaving a thin coating of joint compound over all joints and interior angles. One additional coat of joint compound shall be applied over all joints and interior angles. Fastener heads and accessories shall be covered with two separate coats of joint compound. All joint compound shall be smooth and free of tool marks and ridges. Before final decoration it is recommended that the prepared surface be coated with a drywall primer prior to the application of final finishes. Level 3 is not recommended where smooth painted surfaces, light textures, or light- to medium-weight wall coverings become the final decoration.

Level2

Level 4

If the final decoration is to be a flat paint, light texture or lightweight wall covering, a Level 4 finish is recommended. As stated in Level 4, “All joints and interior angles shall have tape embedded in joint compound and shall be immediately wiped with a joint knife leaving a thin coating of joint compound over all joints and interior angles. Two separate coats of joint compound shall be applied over all flat joints and one separate coat of joint compound shall be applied over interior angles. Fastener heads and accessories shall be covered with three separate coats of joint compound. All joint compound shall be smooth and free of tool marks and ridges.” It is recommended that the prepared surface be coated with a drywall primer prior to the application of final finishes.

In severe lighting areas, flat paints applied over light textures tend to reduce joint photographing. Paints with sheen levels other than flat as well as enamel paints are not recommended over this level of finish. Special attention should be paid to long corridors, large areas of wall, and large/multiple windows when specifying Level 4, because these areas are potential areas of concern in achieving acceptable wall finishes, and may need to be specified appropriately.

Level3

Level 5
Level 5 finish is recommended for areas where severe lighting conditions exist and areas that are to receive gloss, semi-gloss, enamel or non-textured flat paints. Level 5 requires all the operations in Level 4. Additionally, a thin skim coat of joint compound, or material manufactured especially for this purpose, is applied to the entire surface. A thorough explanation of “skim coat” is given in the comments section of GA-214.

A skim coat of joint compound is intended to conceal small imperfections in joints and on the surface of the gypsum board to help conceal joints and create the appearance of flatness. A skim coat will also smooth the texture of the paper, minimize differences in surface porosity, and create a more uniform surface to which the final decoration can be applied.

Level4

3 Billion plastic bottles and some really smart people

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What do you get when a company wants to make their carpet exclusively with plastic bottles? Much cleaner landfills, and oh, carpets that are the best in the world!
True Built Home and Mohawk, the award-winning flooring people, have teamed up to bring the most durable, stain and wear resistant carpets in the industry.
To learn more about EverStrand click here.
EverStrand is True Built Home’s standard line of carpets. It is a polyester carpet, or better know as PET. In fact up to 99% of all carpets in the US are synthetic in nature. If you are currently having a home built by True Built Home and have yet to order the carpet, you may want to visit with your office to see what the possibility is of having EverStrand installed instead of our previous standard carpet. Why?
EverStrand is made exclusively from 100% recycled water bottles. These bottles, before being discarded, were approved for human needs from the FDA. Low to zero VOC.
EverStrand comes with the best warranty in the carpet business. (Some highlights are below)
Lifetime stain resistance 10-year abrasive wear 10-year texture retention 10-year soil resistance 10-year manufacturing defects.

Step It Up A Notch!

For a little extra money, you can upgrade to the SmartStrand, a nylon carpet which has the ONLY built-in stain and soil protection that NEVER wears off. Other carpets lose as much as 50% of their protection after three steam cleanings. So, in about 54 months, you lose 50% of the stain protection but with SmartStrand, you still retain 100% protection! You can download their Brochure if you’d like. Need a little proof, what about Red Wine?
Flooring Protection to the Max
Finally, our laminates or engineered hardwoods from Mohawk with Armormax. What is Armormax?

Introducing the industry’s most durable coating system for hardwoods, Mohawk’s ArmorMax™ Finish Technology offers maximum protection for your floor. Combined with Scotchgard™ Advanced Repel Technology, ArmorMax serves as the ultimatebarrier against staining and abrasions that come with everyday life.

  • Tested and proven protection that is five times more resistant to wear than other similar extended wear finishes.
  • Built-in surface shield repels stains and everyday messes for long-lasting performance in your home.
  • Easy maintenance, as ArmorMax Finish eliminates the need for frequent hardwood cleaning and floors look newer for longer.
  • Backed by a 50-year finish warranty.
Basically, Mohawk took on 6 other competitors according to the principles of ASTM D 4060 They sit a sander if you will, with essentially is 320 grit sand paper and a little over a pound and half weight on it. Every time the sander makes one revolution, it is counted as such until in does it 500 times, or better know as a cycle. Mohawk products with Armormax lasted up to 3000 revolutions, or 5 times tougher than their closest competitor!
So, if you are thinking of building a home with a “cheaper kind of builder”, remember, the old saying, “the cheapest person always pays the most”. True Built Home has your back! We don’t settle for the cheapest product to put in your house. That’s what others do. We look for the best value, but more importantly, when it comes to flooring, those that will stand the test of time!
Please call or email us to discuss True Built Home’s incredible line of products, benefits, and features. You can reach us by email at contact@truebuilthome.com  For a brief video about Mohawks products, you can click here. Or on our YouTube.
Learn all you want about carpets here.

Hybrid Hot Water Tanks-Why Wise, and How They Work

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Having hot water is essential to the modern family. Thanks to some genius in the past, we no longer have to cut word and boil it over a fire! After all, after cutting all that wood, who needs a hot bath or shower.

The old ways of heating the water in a conventional water tank, well are about to “tank” as new methods, along with cheaper methods, come along. Today you have several choices to heat your water to save money. 1. Chop wood and boil (as discussed, not the best way). 2. Electric tank with what essential is a wire coil that heats the water (what most homes have). 3. On demand (stay far away from electrical ones, gas ones are great) 4. Solar (more money, but will eventually come down in price) 5. Hybrid (the most popular choice). Today we are looking at the hybrid means.

Hybrid hot water tanks work a lot like a heat pumps that cool and heat your home in a much more efficient means than an electric furnace package and an air conditioner. The Heat Pump Water Heater is an integrated system that utilizes heat pump technology to provide a more efficient way to heat water with electricity. Similar to your home air conditioner in reverse, the Heat Pump Water Heater extracts heat from the surrounding air and transfers the heat to the water in the tank. This is a very efficient means of heating water, and yields a by-product of cooler, dehumidified air. More storage capacity allows the water heater to operate in the most efficient mode and generate greater savings compared to smaller capacity heat pump models. Greater storage capacity provides more hot showers every morning. Essential, the hybrid hot water tank can save you on average about $300 per year. With local and state rebates, you might be able to re-coop the cost of the hybrid hot water tank in about 3 years or less. The great thing is you should see immediate savings each month. In addition, the hybrid hot water tank has a monitor control area that you can adjust on a moments notice. It will have a vacation mode and by simply touching the button, wham, it converts to vacation mode.

You can check out more information here.

Combine the hybrid with a high efficacy heat pump, some heal trusses, triple pane windows, and you are on your way ever month at savings hundreds and thousands of dollars over the course of these modern products lives.

The Pros and the cons;

Pros

  • Saves money every month
  • Quick adjustment to heat settings
  • Pretty cool looking
  • Will make you feel good going green

Cons

  • The cost will take about 3 years to re-coop
  • They have to be in the garage or must be vented if installed within the home
  • Makes noise
  • Slightly bigger than a standard hot water tank